Landlords invest in property by a variety of means and using myriad methods. However, regardless of their individual motivation, ambition and circumstances all have made a significant financial commitment to property on the basis of which they expect a return.

There are countless barriers, including the various forms of taxation, to landlords seeing a satisfactory return on their investment. The NLA exists to minimise the impact of these obstacles and to ensure that landlords are not unreasonably hindered from letting property.

The NLA works consistently and constructively with the Treasury, other government departments and offices to maintain an equitable balance between the contributions made by the PRS to the Exchequer and the level of taxation which allows landlords to see reasonable returns on their investment.

The PRS has made great improvements in relation to improving the quality and condition of its housing stock, but still has some way to go in order to provide parity with other tenures. Unfortunately…
Capital Gains Tax (CGT) is a tax charged on the profits made when an asset is ‘disposed of’. For landlords this normally means that they face a significant bill whenever they sell part of their…
The private-rented sector is made up of an estimated 2.4 million households, comprising houses in multiple occupation (HMOs), student houses, apartments, family homes and luxury lets. In market terms…
Encouraging investment in residential property by large corporations and consortia of investment vehicles has been a long term objective of successive governments. On numerous occasions the press and…
Council Tax was introduced in 1993 as a replacement for the Community Charge ("Poll Tax"). It is the principle form of local government taxation in England, Scotland and Wales. Under Council Tax…
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