Planting the seeds this National Gardening Week

This week marks National Gardening Week - the country’s biggest celebration of gardening and a time to show your neighbours, family, and friends just how green-fingered you are!  

As people take a more active interest in understanding where their food comes from, as well as the idea of sustainability, it’s important that every home has the space to grow fresh produce and plants.  

Whether it’s a single pot of basil on the kitchen windowsill, a balcony full of flowers, or an allotment overflowing of home-grown fruit and vegetables, there is an option for every home.  

But while gardening might be considered a way to bring community together, landlords report that garden maintenance is a common a source contention with their tenants. Most frequently, disagreements occur about who should pay for its upkeep, as well as what are considered acceptable adaptions to the garden. 

Whose responsibility is it to upkeep the garden of a rental property? 

Depending what was included in the tenancy agreement, it will either fall on you, the tenant, or an outside party (gardening service, landscaper, or handyman) to complete the work. Any fees you incurred for maintaining the garden can be covered by you or included as part of the rent.  

Should the tenant not fulfil their side of the agreement as stipulated in the contract, you can take the cost of any work on the garden out of their deposit, provided it was a clearly expressed clause in the tenancy agreement. You will need to provide evidence, so make sure you get pictures of the garden taken when you do the inventory.  

Should I let my tenant make alterations to the garden?  

If you have a particularly green-fingered tenant, you may be inclined to let them make alterations to the outdoor space, however this should be approached with caution.  

It is vital that you ensure you and your tenant are on the same page when it comes to what you consider acceptable alterations to the garden. We advise that any work completed by the tenant be overseen by you.  

If you’d like to encourage your tenant to take a more active interest in the maintenance of outdoor space, there are several things you can do to encourage your tenants to get involved with gardening:  

  • Gift your tenant some potted herbs to put on their window sill to kick start their gardening journey 

  • Allow your tenant to turn part of the garden into a small allotment space (under your watchful eye of course!)  

  • Plant fruit trees in the garden which will provide the tenants with fruit during summer months 

  • Provide empty plant pots for the balcony  

  • Give out recipe cards, activity sheets or gardening factsheets to your tenants to inspire them to grow their own food. 

Sign up to the newsletter

Like this article? Sign up to our free mailing list and join 35,000 landlords who trust us to deliver licensing and legislation updates, thought provoking news pieces, and practical property advice straight to their inbox.

Like this article? Sign up to our free mailing list and join 35,000 landlords who trust us to deliver licensing and legislation updates, thought provoking news pieces, and practical property advice straight to their inbox.  

3 May 2019 - 4:00pm
Hash Tags
Blog Type

Join the NLA

The NLA is the UK's leading association providing support for private residential landlords, serving over 40,000 members nationwide. New landlords join the NLA for advice, information and guidance and to keep up-to-date with fast changing laws and regulations.

Join today and receive instant access to a wide range of key landlord services, award-winning resources and exclusive supplier discounts.

Become a member