Communities defeat terrorism: An NLA podcast 

In our most recent podcast, Richard Blanco was joined by Superintendent Adam Thompson where they discussed counterterrorism, and how landlords can potentially help foil extremist plots.  

In 2018, the National Counter Terrorism Security Office (NaCTSO) developed a learning module aimed at helping organisations understand and mitigate against terrorist methodology. 

ACT Awareness eLearning will provide nationally recognised corporate CT guidance to help business, including landlords, understand the threat from terrorism. The course includes modules on dealing with suspicious behaviour and items, bomb threats, and supporting tenants if they are affected by terrorism incidents, among other things.  

The training, which is free to access, can give landlords the training they need to potentially save lives. Companies must currently register to take part in the training but NaCTSO are looking to do away with this, with Counter Terrorism hoping to make the training readily available to everyone in the near future.  

Terrorism and the PRS 

Adam explains how tradespeople carrying out work on a property, and landlords dropping by for a routine visit, have played an integral role in flagging suspicious behaviour, which was later linked to other intelligence.  

Communities really do defeat terrorism, and the police and Counter Terrorism depend on information from the public in order to prevent attack.    

There is no hard and fast list of identifiers to suggest terrorist activity, so, what are the signs that landlords should be looking out for? 

Prejudice  

Landlords might be afraid to raise the alarm about a tenant out of fear of being perceived as prejudiced, or that in doing so would damage their relationship with the tenant, particularly if their suspicions turn out to be unfounded.  

How can landlords ensure their actions are not judged the wrong way? 

Supporting tenants

Terrorism can happen to anyone, at any time. How can landlords support tenants who have been subjected to terrorism or terrorist threats? Even if they haven’t, is there anything your tenants need to look out for? And what should they do if they see anything suspicious? 

Liability 

While it is the responsibility of the landlord to secure the property and protect tenant’s health and safety, there is no protect duty from a counter terrorism perspective. Could landlords be held liable for terrorist activity in their property?  

You can listen to the podcast in full here or on iTunes.  

31 January 2019 - 3:31pm
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